Analysis Paralysis

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If you’re reading this blog, there’s no doubt that you’ve suffered from analysis paralysis. You’ve got to build that chicken coop, but you’re spending hours pouring over books, Pinterest boards and how-to websites. Add endless debates with your spouse and you’ve got a recipe for inaction. “Sicklied o’er with the pale cast of thought” is the way Shakespeare describes this condition in Hamlet.

The re-design of our backyard lead to the worst analysis paralysis I’ve ever experienced. Weeks went by with no progress. Ideas came and went. The internet made it worse by providing way too many possibilities.

A quote in a book finally broke my analysis paralysis spell. The gist of that quote was that we are all called by a higher power to build. I realized that I needed to set a deadline, get off my ass and construct the raised beds that I had spend endless hours researching, planning and discussing. I told Mrs. Homegrown that this Saturday I was buying lumber and cutting wood. I quickly drew up plans in SketchUp and started working.

The first hexagonal raised bed attempt came out a bit too small so I went back to SketchUp and re-sized the plans.  My self imposed deadline worked. Within a few hours I had the beds that I wanted and was very pleased with the results. The analysis paralysis spell was broken. What had been a concept on a computer screen become reality in short order. It felt good.

Sometimes life is a struggle, but increasingly I feel the need to build more and struggle less. No more neighborhood council meetings. I’m fatigued reading about the latest political outrage, petitions and pleas in Facebook. At this point in my life I just want to build.

What was your worst case of analysis paralysis? How do you deal with it?

Saturday Linkages: Logs, Invasives and Italian Veggies

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Italian veggie tips: Amicidellortodue http://feedly.com/e/AeUKDhxu 

The Trouble with the Word “Invasive” | Garden Rant http://gardenrant.com/2014/01/the-trouble-with-the-word-invasive.html …

Colon shaped tiny hotel: http://www.unusualhotelsoftheworld.com/casanus

OTIS | Tiny House Swoon http://tinyhouseswoon.com/otis/ 

Changing the maple syrup paradigm. Crazy efficient, yet also grim, from the tree’s perspective– and mine. http://www.uvm.edu/~uvmpr/?Page=news&storyID=17209#.Ut8epeX8ggE.twitter …

Urban Nature: How to Foster Biodiversity in World’s Cities by Richard Conniff: Yale Environment 360 from @YaleE360 http://e360.yale.edu/feature/urban_nature_how_to_foster_biodiversity_in_worlds_cities/2725/#.Ut78MbYkqKk.twitter …

Building With Logs – 1957 USDA Government Pamphlet http://feedly.com/e/SggnDsK7 

Milky The Marvelous Milking Cow toy (1977) – Boing Boing http://boingboing.net/2014/01/21/milky-the-marvelous-milking-co.html#.Ut7IQL46aLw.twitter …

The Sony SRF-39FP: The Audio Player of Choice in Prison http://gizmodo.com/the-sony-srf-39fp-the-audio-player-of-choice-in-prison-1504910322 …

John Dobson dies at 98; former monk developed easy-to-make telescope http://www.latimes.com/obituaries/la-me-john-dobson-20140119,0,6483430.story …

Organic Seed Growers Webinar

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I’ve enjoyed all the webinars from the eOrganic folks. While they are oriented towards small farmers, I’ve found them useful for us home gardeners. They are putting on a seed growing webinar at the end of this month. I’m especially looking forward to the pollinator lecture, featuring Eric Mader of The Xerces Society, that takes place on Saturday February 1st. Here’s the 411 on the conference, which is free:

Join eOrganic and the Organic Seed Alliance for selected live webinar broadcasts from the 7th Organic Seed Growers’ Conference at Oregon State University in Corvallis Oregon on January 31st and February 1st, 2014. The online broadcast is free and open to the public, and advance registration is required. It will take place on both days from 12-8 Eastern Time, 11-7 Central, 10-6 Mountain, and 9-5 Pacific Time.

Register for the live broadcast of selected presentations at http://www.extension.org/pages/70186
Note: You only need to register once, and you may come and go on both days as you wish!

Schedule of Organic Seed Growers’ Conference Webinar Broadcasts

Friday January 31, 2014
9:00-10:30AM:  Why Organic Seed Matters and How to Meet the Demand

Organic seed that meets the diverse agronomic challenges and market needs of organic farmers is fundamental to their success and the food system they supply. The organic community has seen tremendous progress in the expansion of organic seed availability. Still, most organic farmers are planting non-organic seed. This session will focus on improving access to, and the use of, organic seed. Topics will include the importance of organic seed in the context of organic integrity and the principle of continual improvement, the 2013 NOP guidance document on organic seed, and demonstrations of new tools and resources.
Speakers: Theresa Podoll, Prairie Road Organic Seed; Erica Renaud, Vitalis Organic Seeds; Zea Sonnabed, CCOF and National Organic Standards Board; Chet Boruff, Association of Official Seed Certifying Agencies (AOSCA)

Friday January 31, 2014
1:00-3:30PM Research Update: Small Grains and Corn

The scientific field of organic plant breeding continues to expand. This session will give an overview of innovative organic research being conducting today in small grains and sweet corn. Hear reports from six researchers and participate in the question and answer.
Speakers: Hannah Walters, Seed Matters Graduate Student, Washington State Unviersity; Brook Brower, Seed Matters Graduate Student, Washington State University; Jonathan Spero, Lupine Knoll Farm; Amadeus Zschunke, Sativa Rheinau; Lisa Kissing Kucek, Cornell University; Adrienne Shelton, Graduate Student, University of Wisconsin – Madison

Friday, January 31, 2014
3:30-5:00PM:  Research Update: Vegetable Crops

There are exciting advances in breeding vegetables for organic production systems. This session will give an overview of innovative organic research being conducting today in vegetable crops. Hear reports from six researchers.
Speakers: Phil Simon, University of Wisconsin-Madison; Laurie McKenzie, Organic Seed Alliance; John Navazio, Organic Seed Alliance; Lori Hoagland, Purdue University; Michael Mazourek, Cornell University

Saturday, February 1, 2014
9:00-10:30AM: Unpacking the Cell Fusion Debate

Last year the National Organic Program (NOP) clarified its position on the use of cell fusion in organic seed production, drawing attention to an ongoing debate involving what should and should not be an excluded method in the organic standards. This session will include both technical and philosophical discussion on the current use of cell fusion in organic seed development, the NOP’s current policy, and what different breeding methods mean for the organic movement and biodiversity. Speakers: John Navazio, Organic Seed Alliance; Jodi Lew-Smith, High Mowing Organic Seeds; Jim Myers, Oregon State University; Zea Sonnabend, CCOF and National Organic Standards Board

Saturday, February 1, 2014
1:30-3:00PM: Pollinator Conservation Strategies for Organic Seed Producers

This session will support organic seed producers with the latest science-based information on maximizing crop yields through the conservation of native pollinators, while at the same time helping them to reduce the risk of outcrossing with non-organic crop varieties. Specific topics include the ecology of specialty seed crop pollinating insects, foraging behaviors and flight range of key native bee groups (and the impact of those foraging ranges on crop isolation), bee-friendly farming practices, development of pollinator habitat on working farms, accessing USDA technical and financial resources for pollinator conservation, and more. Speakers: Eric Mader, The Xerces Society

Saturday, February 1, 2014
3:30-5:00PM: Managing Seed-Borne Diseases in Seed Production

Production of high-quality, pathogen-free seed is particularly important in organic seed crops given the very limited chemical options available for certified organic production, and the risk of producing and distributing contaminated seed lots. Learn about managing diseases in seed production with various research examples from the vegetable seed crop pathology program at Washington State University, and hot water treatment for seed-borne diseases. Speakers: Lindsey du Toit, Washington State University – Mount Vernon Research & Extension Center; Jody Lew-Smith, High Mowing Organic Seeds