Who’s Visiting Your Garden While You’re Not Watching?

My beautiful picture

I did a little experiment earlier this month and left our new CritterCam on for a period of five days, pointed at our backyard shed, to see what animals are visiting. The motion sensitive camera picked up seven visits from a possum, six birds, four skunk visitations, two rats, one raccoon and two house cats. I need to let the camera run for a longer period to get a better sense of what times of the day or night are the most active, but so far the hour of 2 am picked up the most activity (after the bars have closed on Sunset Blvd. perhaps?).

My beautiful picture

The pictures are showing what I think are mini wildlife corridors. Note the similar direction the possum and skunk seem to be heading.

The cat (which belongs to a neighbor):

My beautiful picture

And the raccoon (below) are also headed in the same direction.

My beautiful picture

That raccoon pic is another reminder for me to recheck my chicken coop’s fortifications.

My beautiful picture

And the rat is telling me to lock up the chicken food at night.

Reviewing these images has given me a less adversarial feeling about our mammalian visitors. They are just so damn cute, especially the skunk.

Next up in my CritterCam experiments will be to see who is visiting the bird bath. I’ll need some help from readers for that, since I don’t know my birds.

Stoicism Today

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We’re honored to have an essay in a new book, Stoicism Today: Selected Writings.

From Stoic ethics to emotions, from Stoic mayors and mindfulness to practical philosophy, parenting, psychotherapy and prisons, from Star Trek and Socrates to Stoic lawyers, literature and living in general, this book brings together a wide-ranging collection of reflections on living the Stoic life today. You’ll read advice on coping with adversity, reflections on happiness and the good life and powerful personal testimonies of putting Stoicism into practise. But you’ll also read about the links between Stoicism and psychotherapy, Stoicism and mindfulness meditation and the unexpected places Stoicism can pop up in modern culture. This book will be of interest to both academics and non-academics alike and is about the varied ways in which the 2,300 year old philosophy as a way of life remains relevant to the concerns and needs of the present day.

The book is available as a paperback and Kindle e-book.

The Stoicism Today website also has a free handbook and online course, well worth checking out.

Saturday Linkages: Wind Maps, Wildlife Gardens and Other Obsessions

V0041123 Human proportions established through mythological figures.

The Mysterious Geometry of Swordsmanship, Gorgeously Illustrated:  http://tinyurl.com/lypzaon

Live wind map:

Clam Aspic Salad – A Vintage Recipe Re-Run

When Wildlife Gardens Look Like Gardens | Garden Rant

Middle Eastern Roots of Spice Trade: The Origins of Culinary Imperialism and Globalization

The fear of bees

Is fall fertilization a good idea?

Fast Facts about Cutting Boards and Food Safety in Your Kitchen (from The Abstract)

Beautiful Cat Shelter Designs from Architects for Animals LA Event –

For these links and more, follow Root Simple on Twitter:

An Ancient Quince Recipe

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The Karp’s Sweet quince in our front yard, despite struggling in terrible soil, has finally started producing. This year we got about three pounds. Some of the fruit gets sunburned (note to self–put up some shade cloth next year!). But I’ve been able to cut out the browned part.

Each year the question comes up as to what to do with the fruit. You can eat Karp’s Sweet quince raw, but the texture is still quince-like, which is to say somewhat gritty and course. And each year I promise I’ll pick up a copy of Barbara Ghazarian’s comprehensive book Simply Quince, but somehow I never get around to it.

Last year I tried to make quince jelly, but overshot the jell point and ended up with jars of delicious tasting, but disagreeably hard quince gum. And Kelly just threw out my burned membrillo from last year.

This year Kevin West, author of Saving the Season came to the rescue with an ancient (the first known reference to a sweet preserve) and simple recipe by Pliny. The full recipe is on West’s website,  but to summarize you simply cook quince in equal parts honey and water until it turns red. The addition of a small amount of cracked pepper cuts the sweetness ever so slightly. You can then process the jars in a hot water bath. The end result is quince slices preserved in honey. It turned out great and, without having to worry about the jell point, reduced the anxiety level associated with preserving my entire harvest at once.

Do you have a quince tree? What do you do with the fruit?

018 Wendy and Mikey of Holy Scrap Hot Springs

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On the 18th episode of the Root Simple Podcast I talk to Wendy Tremayne and Mikey Sklar of the blog Holy Scrap Hot Springs. Wendy is the author of the book The Good Life Lab: Radical Experiments in Hands-On Living. Wendy and Mikey are the ultimate “makers” and it was great to finally get a chance to talk to them and talk about their experiences in Truth or Consequences, New Mexico. During the podcast we discuss:

  • Mikey’s Battery Charger Kit
  • Wendy’s wildcrafting
  • Their adventures in biodiesel production
  • 6x6x10 Remesh as a framework for shade cloth over vegetables
  • What failure teaches
  • Wild desert foods
  • How they juice prickly pear fruit
  • “Mad skills”
  • Mikey’s temperature controller for fermentation and sous-vide

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You can find their store at: store.holyscraphotsprings.com.

If you want to leave a question for the Root Simple Podcast please call (213) 537-2591 or send an email to [email protected]. You can subscribe to our podcast in the iTunes store and on Stitcher. The theme music is by Dr. Frankenstein. Additional music by Rho. A downloadable version of this podcast is here.