A Report from the 2014 Heirloom Expo in Santa Rosa

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If you like this blog you’d like the annual Heirloom Expo, which takes place in Santa Rosa in Northern California in September. I just got back from attending this year’s event and had a great time, as usual. I’ve attended every year since its inception in 2010.

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The Expo features mind boggling displays of what can only be called vegetable porn. Hint: if you hang around after the conclusion on Thursday evening you can score the display items. For two years in a row we’ve gone home with a rental car stuffed with heirloom watermelon and squash.

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But the real draw for me are the seminars and panel discussions. Above, some of the leading figures in the Northern California permaculture scene: Toby Hemenway, Penny Livingston, Erik Ohlsen, Grover Stock and John Valenzuela.

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There’s also a huge vendor hall. I have to keep a tight grip on my wallet.

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Santa Rosa was the home of horticulturalist Luther Burbank and the local chapter of the California Rare Fruit Growers is particularly fervent and knowledgeable. I used the opportunity to chat up a CRFG operative and get all my quince and pineapple guava questions answered.

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You’ll be hearing a number of Expo speakers on our podcast and I’ll do some blog posts inspired by what I learned. If you didn’t make it this year, I hope to meet some of you at next year’s event. I always stay at the nearby Spring Lake campground. Perhaps we can all camp together next year.

Picture Sundays: Root Simple Compound Caught On Google Street View

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It appears that Google Street View, back in April, caught me in the act of contemplating cleaning the garage. You can tell from my posture that I’m in the intellectual rather than the physical stage of garage sorting. In the front yard the fruit trees have leafed out, clarkia is blooming in the sparse parkway, the nopal is loaded with immature fruit and the roses have yet to climb the entrance arbor.

If only I had a Root Simple banner and and an alpaca to take to lunch.

Saturday Linkages: Attic Bedrooms, Septic System Scams and Water

attic room of my dreams

Dreamy attic bedrooms:

Late-Summer Scenes from DC | Garden Rant

Septic System Scams – Homeowners, Beware!

Sustaining Water

For these links and more, follow Root Simple on Twitter:

016 The Urban Bestiary with Lyanda Lynn Haupt

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On the sixteenth episode of the Root Simple Podcast we interview naturalist Lyanda Lynn Haupt, author of The Urban Bestiary, Crow Planet, Pilgrim on the Great Bird Continent and Rare Encounters with Ordinary Birds.

During the podcast Lyanda covers:

  • The effect of the drought on urban wildlife
  • Invasive species
  • How to get along with wildlife such as skunks, possums, raccoons and coytes
  • The problem with relocating animals (except rats!)
  • Moles and gophers
  • Seeing raccoons during the day
  • Root Simple’s CritterCam
  • Possums!
  • Preventative measures
  • How to encourage wild animals and increase diversity by planting native plants and trees

Lyanda also answers listener questions about hawks, coyotes, and feral cats.

Lyanda blogs at The Tangled Nest.

If you want to leave a question for the Root Simple Podcast please call (213) 537-2591 or send an email to [email protected]. You can subscribe to our podcast in the iTunes store and on Stitcher. The theme music is by Dr. Frankenstein. Additional music by Rho. A downloadable version of this podcast is here.

The Arroyo Co-op in Pasadena

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Back in the 1970s the phone book for Los Angeles had dozens of food co-ops. Until just recently that number had dwindled to one (in Santa Monica), in a region of some 13 million people. Which is why I’m happy to help get the word out about the new Arroyo Co-op.  If you’re interested in joining here’s the press release I was sent:

When you shop at your local supermarket, do you feel like you really belong there? Do you wish you had an alternative – one that would offer you products you trust, and employees who will engage with you? Do you wish your shopping could help you build and support your community?

Welcome to the Arroyo Food Co-op!

The Arroyo Food Co-op is our effort to bring community and social values to the residents of Pasadena and surrounding areas. A dream in 2009, given an address in 2013, the Co-op officially opened its doors in 2014, as an on-line grocer coupled with a brick-and-mortar market. Co-op members can select from hundreds of items on our website (http://order.arroyofoodcoop.com/), and orders are ready for in-store pick up twice a week. Located at 494 Wilson Avenue in Pasadena, the Co-op is open for in-store shopping and order pickup on Tuesdays, from 4 to 7 p.m., and Saturdays from 9 a.m. to noon. More hours coming soon – ultimately we want to be open 7 days a week. This is only the beginning!

Our goal is not just to offer another shopping opportunity, but to provide an alternative to traditional markets. The Co-op provides a line of products that reflect our values and our hope for the future, made with sustainable manufacturing and marketing processes, healthy, natural, non-GMO and organic ingredients, minimal packaging and a low carbon footprint. We have pantry basics, personal care items, pet supplies (including chicken feed!) and, as a co-op, we can be responsive to member requests.

In addition to building a neighborhood market with a conscience, Arroyo Food Co-op is building a community around it. We bring people from all walks of life together at the co-op, for educational and social gatherings that share the theme and values we pursue in our product line. In an effort to foster connections and growth, we host a weekend meeting called “Food for Thought”, where we invite those in our community who are working to make a difference, to come and share their knowledge and experience with our membership.

Our store has opened on a shoestring, but that won’t hold us back! We’ve come a long way in 5 years, from a dream to a real store, through the efforts of a core of dedicated volunteers. We still have a way to go – and we’ll get there faster with more members!If you want to be able to shop your conscience, and meet other like-minded folk, please check out our product offerings and consider joining us. It only takes $30 to get started, and every purchase you make helps our dream of community come closer to reality.

The Arroyo Food Co-op – Good People, Good Stuff