Making Beer in Plain Language

...r.” -Guggenheim Fellowship-winning professor of rhetoric and comparative literature Judith Butler via the Bad Writing Contest Huh? At least the terminology surrounding beer making ain’t that obtuse, but it certainly could use some simplification. For novice home brewers, such as us here at Homegrown Evolution, the terminology creates an unnecessary barrier as impenetrable as a graduate school seminar in the humanities. Let...

Continue reading…

Picture Sundays: Mountain of Squash

This mountain of heirloom squash was the centerpiece of the National Heirloom Exposition that took place in Sonoma in September of last year. Next year’s Exposition will be taking place on September 10, 11, and 12 at the Sonoma County Fairgrounds. The past two years have featured an amazing roster of speakers and exhibitors all for a very low admission charge. It’s well worth traveling a long distance to attend this unique event. If...

Continue reading…

Return of Recipe Friday! Carrot Soup

ple soup can have so much flavor. The sweet-spicy flavor and bright orange color also make it an ideal dish for this time of year. Each time I eat it I feel like I’m doing something really good for my body. Carrot Soup 2 tablespoons olive oil or butter About 2 pounds of carrots, peeled and sliced into chunks* (Peeling is optional but the soup tends to be sweeter/less earthy if you peel. To tell the truth. I never weigh my carrots–I...

Continue reading…

Happy Halloween!

Turnip lantern by Nathan deGargoyle.  Follow the link to read his thoughts on the Manx version of Halloween Mrs. Homegrown here: I’ve always been intrigued with Samhain, and the idea that a new year should begin in growing darkness, working its way slowly through the deep of winter into the light. For this reason, Halloween has become my personal New Year (since by Jan. 1st, I’m always tired out disillusioned, and overstuff...

Continue reading…

Straw Bale Garden Part V: Growing Vegetables

It’s too early to call my straw bale garden a success but, so far, the vegetables I planted in the bales are growing. I got a late start on planting–I put in the tomatoes, squash and basil in mid May/Early June–just in time for the cloudy, cool weather we have here in early summer. Check out the difference between the tomato I planted in a bale on the left, compared with a tomato in one of my raised beds. The tomato in the ba...

Continue reading…

Lila Downs Video Showing Tortilla Making in Oaxaca

ons Gloria). Lyrics in English after the jump. The beautiful people of this land Grind corn A miracle of their hands A yellow shine I saw In a basket she carries gold Soft corn gold In a basket she carries gold Soft corn gold It’s over… my suffering is over There’s no more evil… there’s no evil that can last a hundred years Little dove fly and tell her That I’m here to kiss her hands Little dove fly and tell her That I’m here to kiss her hands Cu...

Continue reading…

Making It e-Book Corrected

To those of you who purchased an e-version of our book Making It and had trouble reading it, I just received a note from our publisher Rodale: The “disappearing words” are actually words that appear in a faint gray color that was hard or impossible to see over light background color settings on some devices, especially the Kindle from Amazon. We have corrected the e-book files and re-released them to all retailers. The corrected vers...

Continue reading…

New Project: Making Bitters

...ing things you find in your spice cabinet. Since these are flavoring, not medicine, you don’t have to be as careful with the quantities and timing as you must be when tincturing herbs for medicine. Yet at the same time, it’s a great introduction to that essential herbalist’s craft. Read her post, and have fun! How to Make Homemade Bitters: Cooking Lessons from The Kitchn....

Continue reading…