Cat Litter Compost, Installment #3

No, our cats aren’t privileged or anything. A gentle reader reminds us that it’s been too long since we updated you all on the cat litter compost. For background, see Installment One and Installment Two Long story short, cat litter composting can work (under the care of an experienced composter, mind), especially in conjunction with a worm bin–but I’ve found a method I like better. On the composting experiment: In our las...

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Top Ten Vegetable Gardening Mistakes

Not ready for Martha Stewart: our front yard vegetable bed.* Some of the worst meltdowns and temper tantrums of my adult life have their origins in failed vegetable gardening projects. I thought I’d list off my top ten vegetable gardening misadventures  so that you don’t have to repeat them. 1. Not paying attention to soil fertility This is my number one mistake. Most vegetables suck up a lot of nutrients. They need lots of compost...

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Saturday Linkages: Sad Cookbooks, Pancakes and Tiny Homes

The saddest cookbook ever written: http://boingboing.net/2014/01/06/the-saddest-cookbook-ever-writ.html … Another take on sourdough pancakes http://www.wildyeastblog.com/2009/02/24/sourdough-pancakes/ … Simply Yoav –His Yurt and Life http://feedly.com/e/X0VjVnaF  How to pull out a car from a frozen lake… Russian style http://feedly.com/e/fHtO IUrv  Old World Woodworking Tools http://feedly.com/e/0H12BeW1  Tiny Apartments in Cities:...

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Straw Bale Garden: What I Learned

Straw bale garden–April on the left, November on the right. The straw bale garden I started this spring has been one of the most successful vegetable gardens I’ve ever planted. In fact it’s still producing well into November. Here’s what I learned from the experiment: Plants that suck up a lot of nitrogen, like squash, do well in a straw bale garden. My tomatoes flourished but, due to the high nitrogen, made more leaves...

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How to Deal With Thrips on Stone Fruit

Research hint: when you have a pest problem on an edible plant, Google the name of the plant and “UC Davis.” What comes up is UC Davis’ handy Integrated Pest Management info sheets, evidenced based information on all kinds of problems. This is how I figured out that a small insect called the western flower thrip (Frankliniella occidentalis), was noshing on our nectarines. Thrips damage the fruit when it is small. The scars enl...

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Saturday Linkages: Elves, Archdruids and Open Source Furniture

20 Open Source Furniture Designs http://www.shareable.net/blog/20-open-source-furniture-designs … “The Valley of The Elves” by Ellie Pritts https://elliepritts.exposure.so/the-valley-of-the-elves … The Archdruid Report: Seven Sustainable Technologies http://thearchdruidreport.blogspot.com/2014/01/seven-sustainable-technologies.html?spref=tw … Silver Lake stays in step with Rudyard Kipling http://feedly.com/e/2K1ZbhCt  Leaked: environmental chap...

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Ask Lowes and Home Depot to Stop Killing Bees

If you haven’t heard, Friends of the Earth is swarming (ahem) Home Depot and Lowes with cards around Valentines Day, asking these retailers to “show the bees some love” and stop selling bee-killing pesticides (neonicotinoids) and garden plants which have been pre-poisoned with such pesticides. In our opinion, systemic pesticides, like Imidacloprid (which is a neonictinoid) should preferably not be used at all, and certainly s...

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Straw Bale Garden Part V: Growing Vegetables

It’s too early to call my straw bale garden a success but, so far, the vegetables I planted in the bales are growing. I got a late start on planting–I put in the tomatoes, squash and basil in mid May/Early June–just in time for the cloudy, cool weather we have here in early summer. Check out the difference between the tomato I planted in a bale on the left, compared with a tomato in one of my raised beds. The tomato in the ba...

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Root Simple Video Podcast Episode 3: A Tour of Our Straw Bale Garden

In the third episode of the Root Simple Video Podcast we’re taking you into the backyard for a tour of our straw bale garden. We started rotting the bales in late April by adding blood meal. In May we added a balanced fertilizer and started planting the bales. In the video you’ll see the veggies we planted in early June. The soaker hose you see comes from Home Depot. I’m pretty sure it is this stuff. Every other week I add so...

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