Does Sourdough Offer Hope for the Gluten Intolerant?

...myces cerevisiae, to make bread rise quickly. But even before Pasteur, bakers used the yeast remaining from beer making (also a strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae) to make doughs rise. Sourdough cultures are not as powerful and predictable, so it’s understandable that commercial bakers would want a more dependable alternative. What is in a sourdough culture? There are many strains of yeast in sourdough cultures, but the main one is Candida...

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Saturday Linkages: DIY Coffee Roasting and That Crazy Rhubarb Lady

IKEA hack: DIY coffee roaster. DIY IKEA hack FrankenRoaster – DIY Coffee Roaster Drum http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/Ikeahacker/~3/Ii6NHUh_5Hg/frankenroaster-coffee-roaster-drum.html … Made in the Shade: Building a Vertical Garden Under the Canopy of Our Guava Tree http://disq.us/8en1h5 Create Your Own Hipster Logo In 6 Steps http://www.fastcodesign.com/node/1673156  Back to Basics: Direct Hydropower http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/typepad/...

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Cat Litter Compost, Installment #3

...ttle support legs. You could of course DIY this system. See some notes at the end for tips on that. I considered it, but for various reasons decided to throw money at the problem instead of making it a project. I really like this system because a) It’s much neater. Pine litter is less dusty than clumping litter, which means less tracking, less dust on surfaces, cleaner cats. b) And it’s cheaper. Pine litter cost less than clumping bra...

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Eight Things to Consider When Saving Vegetable Seeds

The directions for seed saving in our last book, Making It, almost got cut. Perhaps we should have just changed those directions to “Why it’s OK to buy seeds.” The fact is that it’s not easy to save the seeds of many vegetables thanks to the hard work of our bee friends. That being said, Shannon Carmody of Seed Saver’s Exchange gave a lecture at this year’s Heirloom Exposition with some tip...

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The Lament of the Baker’s Wife

This our flour collection, The Leaning Tower of Pizza.  Erik collects flour like Emelda Marcos collects shoes. The collection is  taking up a good deal of the floor space in our kitchen. Supposedly it will one day be moved to our garage–after the garage is remodeled–but waiting for the garage remodel is somewhat like waiting for Godot, or the Armageddon. Speaking of which, if Armageddon does arrive, you know what...

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Can Whole Wheat Solve the Wheat Allergy Problem?

...asses for amateur bakers, is showing how tasty baked goods can be that are made from real whole wheat flour. But it’s tricky. High extraction whole wheat flours are a lot less uniform than white flours. And they suck up a lot of water when you use them for making bread. As the co-founder of the Los Angeles Bread Bakers I get the gluten sensitivity question a lot which is why I’m interested in hearing from readers. Do you have a wheat...

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Compost and Pharmaceuticals

...residues in compost were significantly lower, if compared to the relevant concentrations in sewage sludge . . . It is concluded that before using the sewage sludge compost as a fertilizer it should be carefully tested against the content of different pharmaceuticals. The content of pharmaceuticals in the compost made from sewage sludge may easily lead to the elevated concentrations in food plants, if the compost is used as a fertilizer. A slight...

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Building With Adobe

Architect and Root Simple friend Ben Loescher, along with Kurt Gardella, is teaching a class on adobe construction. I’m going to attend the second day, November 6th, and hope to see some of you there. Adobe has a storied past and a promising future in the Southwest U.S., in my opinion. Here’s the info on the class: adobeisnotsoftware is pleased to host Kurt Gardella for the first in a series of classes on adobe construction within C...

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Mud for the People! Building an Adobe Garden Wall

...and/clay mixtures drying in the sun. You can also make a brick out of whatever soil you have on hand and see how it holds up. The first test Kurt did was drop one on a corner from about waist high. It didn’t break and thus passed the test. Another test is standing on a brick. Even though the brick we used weren’t really finished drying, they still passed. For a building that will be inspected you will probably have to send bricks to...

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Food Preservation Resources

Due to a popular post on making prickly pear jelly, we get a lot of emails asking for advice on canning. So I thought I’d list three favorite food preservation resources. I like to go to respected sources when canning for reasons of both safety and reliability. While botulism is fairly rare, it’s a highly unpleasant way to pass this vale of tears. But beyond the safety issue, if I’m going to go through the work of canning, I w...

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