Saturday Linkages: From The Woodsman Workout to Crafting With Your Cat

.../Warmer-Temperatures-Make-New-USDA-Plant-Zone-Map-Obsolete.cfm  … Why I don’t Worry Too Much About Organic Fruits and Veggies: http:// ow.ly/1OwcYb  GMO-birthed “Superweeds” Oh joy. You http://www. theawl.com/2012/09/weeds-  The cat food crisis: http:// casaabyayala.tumblr.com/post/293692582 84/la-crisis-de-la-comida-para-gatos-parte-1-the-cat-food  … Bermuda Dunes woman’s garden for eating has some neighbors hissing ht...

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When It Gets Hot in Chicago: Make Tempeh!

...ly harming coolness, we lost most of our tree fruit production. Local orchardists turned to growing supplemental vegetable crops. There are none or not many apples, Asian pears, peaches, cherries or plums this year. No pawpaws. What we are left with is heat-island city fruit, and shrub fruits of currants, gooseberries, black raspberries, blackberries, strawberries, elderberries, wild plums. But it is a okay pear year and I will be getting some Am...

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Introducing Nancy Klehm With Tips on Growing Jerusalem Artichokes

...ar – almost a month ahead according to any record. As a true farmer said: ‘This is the warmest April on record.’ And it was still March when he said it. In the past 10 days, dodging rain and wet soil, I have planted out potatoes, asparagus, peas, collards, chard, kale, radishes, carrots, beets, turnips, salsify, and cress. I have many vegetables, fruits, culinary and medicinal herbs sown and growing under lights indoors that have weeks ahead of...

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Book Review: Attracting Native Pollinators: The Xerces Society Guide to Conserving North American Bees and Butterflies and Their Habitat

...ontents of a new book, Attracting Native Pollinators: The Xerces Society Guide to Conserving North American Bees and Butterflies and Their Habitat. Why? There’s the obvious–pollinating insects provide a huge amount of our food–but they also have a few unappreciated roles. Without pollinators, plant communities that stabilize river banks disappear. Mammals and birds that eat pollinated fruits perish. But perhaps most importantl...

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Farmers Markets: Buyer Beware

...he same size and looks too perfect. It’s a sign they just took the truck to a downtown wholesale warehouse and loaded it up.She also said that many farmers will mix their own produce with wholesale produce. This report came out just after two supermarket chains, Safeway and Albertsons, created fake farmer’s markets inside and outside of their stores. Yet more reasons to grow your own fruits and vegetables if you have space. Lying abo...

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It’s Official: Erik is Insane

...uins of Palenque on the Yucatan peninsula, our Scarlet Runner bean long ago swamped its trellis. Hairy cucumber and tiny tomatoes growing together. The beds have their moments of beauty. Back to the squash. It only bore two fruits. Erik began to obsess over them as soon as they appeared. How would they ever live to maturity? He just knew a thief would take them at zucchini size, and then they’d never reach their potential. Suddenly, it wa...

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Sourdough, Preserves, Barbeque Sauce and Chutney!

...nstrate how to make sourdough bread and Jennie will cook up a batch of her mouthwatering chutney, barbecue sauce and more. Here’s the 411: “Hang out and cook with the Urban Pioneers who created an oasis in So Cal where they grow their own food, bake their own bread and brew their own Hooch. We’ll put up preserves, barbecue sauce and chutney of summer’s final fruits. We’ll dry some tomatoes and let the season add to our other...

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Urban Farm Magazine

We have a article on urban farmers across America in the premiere issue of a magazine bound to appeal to readers of this blog, Urban Farm. Our article, Where Urban Meets Farm, profiles the efforts of our friends the Green Roof Growers of Chicago, Em Jacoby of Detroit and Kelly Yrarrazaval of Orange County. All of these fine folks have repurposed urban and suburban spaces to grow impressive amounts of food, a common sense trend popular enough to...

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Maggots!

...post bin should be easily accessible from the kitchen, but far enough away so that compost problems, like smells and rodents don’t migrate to living quarters. Our pile is located too far from the kitchen, so in our laziness stinky piles of rotting fruits and vegetables often gather on the kitchen counter. The presence of maggots in our pile indicates that we have an overabundance of kitchen scraps and a pile that is not hot enough. Turning...

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Moringa!

...farming efforts at the SurviveLA compound is a Philippino neighbor of ours who has turned his entire front yard and even the parkway into an edible garden featuring fruits and vegetables from his native land, most of which we have never seen before. This morning, while walking the dog, I found him cutting hundreds of long seed pods off of a small attractive tree. He didn’t know the English name of the tree, but he told me that he likes to...

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