Saturday Linkages: I’m tired of doom, let’s garden and make things . . .

Onesmus Mwangi’s homemade helicopter. Gardens Thomas Rainer’s amazing garden http://landscapeofmeaning.blogspot.com/2013/05/pleasure-garden.html?spref=tw … Container planting: intuition vs. reality: http://ow.ly/1WWQXg Praise for Growing Food in a Hotter, Drier Land http://j.mp/ZekBDm DIY Small Batch Strawberry Rhubarb Jam + Rhubarb Recipes from the Archives http://www.foodinjars.com/2013/05/small-batch-strawberry-rhubarb-jam-rhuba...

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Initial Thoughts on the Age of Limits 2013 Conference

This is actually free desktop wallpaper. Who says we’re not looking forward to the apocalypse? Over Memorial Day weekend, Erik and I and our buddy John Zapf, attended a conference called The Age of Limits: Conversations on the Collapse of the Global Industrial Model. This conference brings together different luminaries from the “doomosphere” to discuss the impact and implications of the three-headed hydra of peak oil, climate c...

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Straw Bale Garden Part III: Adding Fertilizer

After watering our straw bales for three days our next step is to apply a high nitrogen fertilizer. We’re following West Virginia University Extension Service’s Straw Bale Gardening advice. They suggest a 1/2 cup of urea per bale or “bone meal, fish meal, or compost for a more organic approach.” (I think they mean blood meal as bone meal does not have much nitrogen in it.) Choosing the organic approach, we’re water...

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Saturday Linkages: Beer Caps n’ Plants

light photos of houseplants: http://plantsarethestrangestpeople.blogspot.com/2013/04/exceptionally-pretty-pictures.htmlntsarethestrangestpeople.blogspot.com/2013/04/except… … grounded design by Thomas Rainer: Noel Kingsbury: The Ghost in the Machine http://landscapeofmeaning.blogspot.com/2013/04/noel-kingsbury-ghost-in-machine.html?spref=tw … For these links and more, follow Root Simple on Twitter: Follow @rootsimple...

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Stoicism as a Toolkit for Modern Life

Lucius Annaeus Seneca ca. 4 BC – AD 65. This is the first in a series of posts focusing on positive techniques for keeping our heads screwed on straight in troubled times. Growing food, doing stuff with your hands, drinking homebrew with friends–all these kinds of things help keep us grounded and hopeful. But sometimes you need a little more help. Maybe we’ll call these posts “When chickens aren’t enough.” Whether t...

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Saturday Linkages: Insect Hotels, Edwardian Hipsters and Biomorphic Light Fixtures

DIY insect hotel spotted on the ever amazing Lloyd’s Blog. Insect Hotels http://lloydkahn-ongoing.blogspot.com/2013/06/insect-hotels.html#.UcEUtDWXvN0.twitter … Good Yard or Bad Yard? Garden Design Pitfalls | Garden Rant http://gardenrant.com/2013/06/good-yard-or-bad-yard-garden-design-pitfalls-2.html … Q & A – Growing Food in a Hotter, Drier Land http://j.mp/1844StH Edwardian stunt bikers – in pictures http://gu.com/p/3ggde/tw  Intera...

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Saturday Linkages: Goats, Chainsaws and a Big Blue Rooster

Mason Jar + Juice Carton = Resealable Dispenser Inspiration Bike Trailers http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/lloydkahn/~3/BGY9jmWITPc/bike-trailers.html … 11 things it took me 42 years to learn http://bit.ly/1175KcM See the Documentary “Wonder: The Lives of Anna and Harlan Hubbard” if You Can by Allen Bush http://gardenrant.com/2013/07/see-the-documentary-wonder-the-lives-of-anna-and-harlan-hubbard-if-you-can.html?utm_source=feedly … Crafty Crafti...

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Farm Hack

Farm Hack is an innovative blog that synthesizes high tech and low tech in the service of growing food and community. The blog is run by the National Young Farmers Coalition. While geared towards agriculture, many of the posts will be of interest to backyard gardeners. Recent subjects include a project to develop an infrared camera to monitor plant health, smartphone tools for farmers and open source appropriate technology resources. It’s...

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Radish Surprise

A volunteer radish–I think it is a daikon–sprouted up in a little clear pocket of our yard. We let it go, ignored it. It grew bigger, and bigger, and bigger. Usually a radish is harvested early, so we never see how big they can get. This one got huge, then burst out into hundreds of tiny purple flowers. Hummingbirds, honey bees and all sorts of flying insects visit it all day, every day. It has become one of the queens of the garden...

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