Permaculture Design Course at the Ecology Center in San Juan Capistrano

I can’t think of a better place to earn a permaculture design certification than the Ecology Center in San Juan Capistrano. Their PDC course starts up soon . . .  Dive deeper into hands-on ecological design with this 3-month certification course in Orange County exploring food, water, waste, energy, and shelter, and become an eco-advocate! Read on for details and download the application. ECO-APPRENTICES / PERMACULTURE...

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Dry Climate Vegetables

...ed bed and is already almost five feet long. I’m not going to let this one grow because I don’t have the space to take a chance with a, most likely, bitter squash. Mustard I threw a bunch of expired mustard seeds from a friend’s pantry around the yard in the fall. This was a bit foolish. Mustard has popped up everywhere. I’ve been feeding most of it to our cooped up chickens. It doesn’t rain here...

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003 Cooking From Scratch, Tortillas, Fencing and Listenter Questions

This week on the Root Simple Podcast Kelly and Erik discuss cooking from scratch, making tortillas, bathroom cats, fencing and answer a reader question about chickens in small spaces. If you want to leave a question you can call (213) 537-2591 or send an email to [email protected] The theme music is by Dr. Frankenstein. Additional music by Rho. A downloadable version of this podcast is here. You can subscribe to our podc...

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Update on Hedge Fund Billionaire Crispin Odey’s $250,000 Chicken Coop

...wed photos of the nearly completed structure on his iPhone. “Once I started thinking about what I wanted to have there, it was a Schinkelian temple.” Karl Friedrich Schinkel, he explained, was the architect who worked for the Prussian royal family, “and built almost all of that stuff you come across in Brandenburg and in Berlin.” Mr. Odey pointed to a relief visible along one wall. “I have the chickens and egg having the age-old fight of who came...

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Easter Lessons

...d slime peeling aside to reveal a much paler egg below–an egg perhaps still of its natural color. Same for the cabbage. The hibiscus was a total nightmare–for some reason its slime was thick and bubbly and black and utterly disgusting. I mean, like Black Plague-level disgusting. Easter buboes! Zombie eggs! Here’s my theory: chickens coat their eggs with a protective coating before the eggs leave the “factory.” Just l...

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New Chicken!

...as really fun, much chicken knowledge was exchanged and we all got to enjoy meeting other like minded folks. At the meeting, this chicken arrived in need of a new home. Since I recently lost a hen, it made sense that I offer her a new abode. She is in a cage inside the coop for a few days, at the recommendation of a more experienced chicken keeper in the group. Today I let her out for a bit and the other chickens instantly attacked. Even my tiny...

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Saturday Linkages: Speedos, Blue Eggs and the Rise of Rye

A rancher of the future according to the 1981 children’s book Tomorrow’s Home. Trojan Horses, Recipes, and Permaculture http://www.patternliteracy.com/770-trojan-horses-recipes-and-permaculture … How bad for the environment are gas-powered leaf blowers? http://wapo.st/14bgqIQ  In Pursuit of Tastier Chickens, a Strict Diet of Four-Star Scraps http://nyti.ms/15yN8EY  Rye’s Rise: New Loaves That Are More Than a Vehicl...

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The Connection Between Human Health and Soil Health

...ea up she cites: Erika von Mutius, who found an intriguing connection between children who grew up on farms and their lack of asthma and allergies later in life. Research that is taking an Integrated Pest Management approach to cancer, treating it as a symptom of a lack of internal biodiversity. Studies that have shown the higher nutritional value of eggs from chickens raised on pasture. It seems obvious that there’s a connection between...

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To each hen her own egg

...217;t capture the olives at all. It’s useful to be able to associate each hen with her egg, so you know if there are any problems with her laying. Unfortunately, these four ladies look so much alike–and tend to visit the nesting box in pairs–so we haven’t been able to ID their eggs yet. Closer surveillance is required! *** And while we’re talking chickens – Update on chicken integration: Regular readers may rem...

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Our Keyhole Vegetable Bed: What Worked and What Didn’t Work

This is what our keyhole bed looked like yesterday just before I fed the remaining vegetables to our chickens and the compost pile. Ignore the large pot–that’s a future solar powered fountain that will be incorporated in a new vegetable garden we’re working on. Here’s what the keyhole bed looked like just after I installed it back in October. Note the compost repository in the cente...

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