Shock the Worm

xlg_shocked_earth

From the November 1932 issue of Modern Mechanix, an idea from an era when people were a lot more cavalier about electricity. Personally, I prefer the safer worm grunting method. Via Modern Mechanix.

Update: Reader Don pointed out the similarity of this idea to the plot of a 1970s horror movie in which a downed power line causes a upward migration of killer worms. Here’s the trailer:

Saturday Linkages: Stealth, Mules and Opiates

van

Stealth Pickup Camper http://frommoontomoon.blogspot.com/2013/10/stealth-pickup-camper.html …

Rocket Stove Heating http://www.notechmagazine.com/2013/10/rocket-stove-heating-systems.html …

Conservation You Can Taste http://garynabhan.com/i/archives/2327 

The Very Different Nomadic Lifestyle Of John Sears And His Three Mules… http://theflyingtortoise.blogspot.com/2013/10/the-very-different-nomadic-lifestyle-of.html …

Restaurants in China spike meals with opiates to keep diners coming back? http://barfblog.com/2013/10/restaurants-in-china-spike-meals-with-opiates-to-keep-diners-coming-back/ …

Okay, Then, It’s a “War on Cars” http://www.thestranger.com/seattle/okay-fine-its-war/Content?oid=9937449 …

For these links and more, follow Root Simple on Twitter:

Dramm’s Breaker Nozzle: My Favorite Watering Implement

Dramm Breaker Nozzle

I can’t count how many cheap watering implements we’ve gone through since we bought this house fifteen years ago. Big box store watering widgets seem to last just a few weeks before heading to the landfill.

I think I’ve found a solution. During the Garden Blogger’s Fling I attended back in June there was a demo by a Dramm Company representative. What impressed me most at the demo was Dramm’s simplest products, the Heavy-Duty Aluminum Water Breaker Nozzle combined with their Aluminum Shut-Off Valve.

400nozzle copy2

The breaker nozzle provides a gentle shower, much like a Haws Watering Can and would be appropriate to use on seedlings and vegetables. The shut-off valve is extremely durable. Neither item has plastic parts. They are sold separately.

While a lot more expensive than those plastic watering wands at the big box store, I have a feeling that these two high quality Dramm components will last a lot longer.

The Smell of Bees

545px-27-alimenti,_miele,_Taccuino_Sanitatis,_Casanatense_4182.

Image: Wikimedia.

A friend called me over to her house today after her gardeners complained about a beehive. We both marched around her yard peering at the eaves of her house. All we found were a handful of wasps.

Then I smelled it–that distinctive, slightly sweet but hard to describe smell that beehives put off. I looked up through a bougainvillea bush and found the hive–living in a garage wall next door to my friend’s house.

If you know what this smell is, please leave a comment as I’ve been unable to find a good answer. I’m guessing that it’s a mixture of many smells: fermenting honey, pollen, wax, propolis, pheromones, etc. And I’m sure that the bees can parse out these smells as easily as we skip around the internet. Micheal Thiele describes beehives as, “a giant nose.”

To us this hive smell is a complex mixture of smell notes, like a good bottle of wine. I have a feeling that to the bees it’s their internet: a complex network of information.