Saturday Linkages:

6a00e0099229e8883301a511963b9a970c-800wi

The Japanese art of Furoshiki–a way of making packages with a reusable cloth. Via No Tech Magazine.

Zero waste shopping in Japan with Furoshiki: http://www.notechmagazine.com/2014/04/furoshiki-zero-waste-shopping-in-japan.html …

A solar powered grain grinder: http://www.notechmagazine.com/2014/04/solar-powered-grain-mill.html …

Bee Friendly Gardening In The Pacific Northwest http://www.nwedible.com/2014/04/bee-friendly-gardening.html …

Nesting for a baby with a small (carbon) footprint http://wp.me/p2SaWz-us 

GR takes on shade gardening: Full sun to part shade. Really? | Garden Rant http://gardenrant.com/2014/03/full-sun-to-part-shade-really.html …

How To Make and Freeze Guacamole http://www.nwedible.com/2014/03/make-freeze-guacamole.html …

Sleek Angle On a Community Garden Shed http://lloydkahn-ongoing.blogspot.com/2014/03/sleek-angle-on-community-garden-shed.html#.UzuV0Idkuj0.twitter …

Pop-Up Plaza Enhances Art Walk, Hints at What Could Be in Leimert http://la.streetsblog.org/2014/04/01/pop-up-plaza-enhances-art-walk-hints-at-what-could-be-in-leimert/#.UzuT7Zz9t1A.twitter …

The terminal stage of oil addiction: http://www.thenation.com/article/179113/we-are-now-terminal-stage-our-fossil-fuel-addiction …

Opting Out: An Introduction – Pacific Standard: The Science of Society http://www.psmag.com/navigation/nature-and-technology/opting-introduction-77049/#.Uzs9IwgcJoo.twitter …

How to host a star party: https://sites.google.com/site/aancsite/articles/host-a-starparty …

For these links and more, follow Root Simple on Twitter:

Quick Relief for Poison Oak

young poison oak

Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

I went camping in Poison Oak Central last week, and though I tried to be careful, I got a kiss on the back of the hand from our rakish woodland friend, Toxicodendron diversilobum (Pacific or Western Poison Oak).

It was, miraculously, the first time I’ve ever had poison oak. I don’t know how I’ve been so lucky so far.  I’ve heard that rubbing native mugwort on the skin can prevent/treat the rash, and I’ve done that a few times when I suspect I’ve brushed against some poison oak. (Mugwort almost always grows where the poison oak does.) Whether all these emergency poultices prevented anything or not is impossible to prove, because I’ve never contracted a rash until this time. I’ll keep doing it, though.

After avoiding the green bandit so long and so well, I was almost happy to get hit at last–in this mild way, mind you–because I was curious to see what the rash would look like and feel like. My exposure really was a kiss. It landed exactly where a gentleman would press his lips to a lady’s hand. Three watery blisters appeared on my knuckles after about 24 hours, accompanied by lots of general redness and itching.

First I poulticed with both mugwort and plantain, but that only worked so-so. Then I hied off to the internet and sifted through the many folk cures until I found one I liked from good ol’ Dr. Weil. He recommended running hot water over the rash, as hot as you can stand it. I don’t remember that he said how long you should do this, but I decided to do it as long as I could stand it, which in my case was probably a minute or so. He said the heat will cause the itching to flare temporarily, but then suppress the itching for hours, and speed healing as well.

Results? It worked like a charm for me. Of course, you want to be careful not to scald yourself and add insult to injury! But with that caveat aside, I definitely recommend giving it a try. I particularly liked that I could do the treatment before bed and fall asleep without itching, and be good until morning, when I’d do it again. All in all, once I discovered the hot water cure, I had bug bites which bothered me more, and lasted longer, than the poison oak rash.

What do you do for poison oak/poison ivy? And to anyone who has been lucky enough to run into both plants, is there a difference between the two in terms of the rash? Is one worse than the other? I’m only familiar with poison oak.

A New Reality

handshake

We received an email from a casting agency searching for talent for a reality show where the participants will live on a remote farm, grow their own food and come up with their own method of governance.  The series will make use of the usual reality show plot device of having participants vote each other off the show. The agency wanted us to put out a casting call.

We won’t do that. I’m tired of stories that sow discord and hold up our lifestyle as something impossible to accomplish. The underlying message? Stay on that couch, don’t try to change the world, just buy the crap our advertisers sell. These type of realty shows are also a rigged version of the prisoner’s dilemma in which the cooperative option (what most people tend to choose in stressful situations) is not allowed.

We need to tell a different story. Bloggers in the urban homesteading movement can join together to cross-promote each other’s efforts. We can continue to offer an alternative through our writing, video, live webinars and, of course, face to face meetings.

I need to step up to the plate too. Years ago I worked as a video editor and cameraman at a university television station and at a PBS affiliate. I need to put everything aside and shoot some video! We don’t need the big networks and the “reality” they churn out. We can tell our own stories. Our narrative will be about people cooperating and sharing knowledge in order to make the world a better place.

If you blog and/or make videos about similar topics please leave a link in the comments.

And for some inspiration take a look at the videos in Kirsten Dirksen’s YouTube channel.

Food Preservation Disasters

failedpreserves

It’s ain’t 24/7 kittens and rainbows at the Root Simple compound. We do have our homesteading disasters. I was reminded of this after I emptied a box full of failed home preservation projects and contemplated a stinky trash can filled with a slurry of bad pickles and too-loose jams.

Of course you have to break a few eggs to make an omelet and, in the interest of learning from mistakes, I thought I’d review two lessons learned.

Not Using Tested Recipes
I vow to use tested recipes from trusted sources. Both for food safety reasons and culinary reasons, it’s a good idea to use trusted sources for home preservation projects. Some of the recipes I tried were from unfamiliar books and dubious websites. Some sources I’ve come to trust:

Between those two sources I’ve got just about all the recipes I need.

lidoff

One Ring to rule them all
When you’re done processing jars and they’ve cooled down, remove the screw bands. Why?

  • So you can clean underneath the band to prevent spoilage and bugs.
  • The screw band can create a false seal.
  • Leaving the screw bands on can cause corrosion.

That’s advice from our own blog and yet I failed, for some reason, to remove the bands on many of the jars I emptied. I found all three of the above problems as a result.

Have you had any epic food preservation disasters?

Root Simple’s Killer Colon Hydro-therapy Booth Coming Soon . . .

1334155845_Colon Hydrotherapy Deals

Normally I’d have to come up with my own April Fool’s post for you.  Increasingly, however, I can’t do any better than the actual unedited pitches we receive in the Root Simple in-box, such as this “killer opportunity”:

Dear Colon Hydro-therapist Friends :-)

I wanted to share an opportunity! with you.  I’m going on tour and
I will be speaking about Raw Foods, cleansing and Super Foods.  I
always talk about the tremendous benefits of getting professional
colonics.  After every single event, numerous amounts of people are
asking how they can find a colon therapist.

There will be anywhere from 300 – 1200 people at each event.  We
are offering booths to Colon Therapists for $500 for the event.
It’s a killer opportunity to get life-long clients in an instant.

Wow, now that’s targeted marketing. How did they know that Kelly and I are ALL ABOUT colonics.  Not only are we Colon Therapist Friends looking for clients, we also have the cleanest colons in the West, thanks to our homemade colonic machine. It’s essentially a mash up of a five gallon bucket, a bunch of  homebrew tubing, and an old 7-setting garden hose sprayer. Video coming soon!

Maybe we can power our Prius with the waste products . . . 

Is Ham Radio Useful?

41Wc3ly5W0L

The BaoFeng UV-5RE.

Last year I got my general and technician amateur radio licences thanks to an easy to learn memory trick. But when it comes to actually using a radio I don’t have a clue. To learn more I joined my local club and took part this last Friday in a contest, using the club’s equipment, to talk to Hams worldwide. The contest involved the quick exchange of call signs. One moment I’d be talking to Japan the next Slovenia, the Azores, Brazil, Venezuela, Mexico, New Zealand–the list of countries went on and on.

I spent three hours in the club’s radio room, located in the emergency communications center at the offices of a local hospital. It was fun, but the utility of the exercise was not immediately apparent. The cell phone system is a lot more robust than it used to be and you don’t need a licence to use a phone in an emergency.

I got home from the contest around 9 pm and as I began to make dinner the windows started rattling and the house began to roll. It was an earthquake. The cats panicked and ran under the couch. Since Ham radio was on my mind I instinctively grabbed my handheld radio and immediately heard the voices of other Hams discussing the earthquake. It was then that I realized how useful amateur radio could be. Not only did I get instant information about the earthquake, but I also had access to a network of people who could help me and my neighbors in a real emergency.

The cats? Not so useful. It took about a half hour for them to emerge from their hiding spaces.

In an emergency it’s a good idea to have a radio and know how to use it. And you don’t have to be a Ham to listen to Ham frequencies. Thanks to cheap imported electronics you can now get a radio that receives and transmits on Ham bands, works as a scanner and even transmits on FRS (family radio service) frequencies–all for $40–the BaoFeng UV-5RE. The Survival Podcast did a whole episode on radios you should have in an emergency and the BaoFeng features prominently in the pantheon of zombie apocalypse communications equipment discussed on that show. I can’t speak from experience about the BaoFeng as I have a Yaesu FT-60. But, combined with a battery operated AM/FM radio, the BaoFeng would make a nice addition to your emergency supplies.

Now if only I could teach the cats to tap out Morse code.

Saturday Linkages: Grains, Collapse and Mangoes

A Silver Lake street library. Image: The Eastsider.

A Silver Lake street library. Image: The Eastsider.

A really well done free street library: New Little Free Library in Silver Lake seeks book donations http://www.theeastsiderla.com/2014/03/bulletin-board-new-little-free-library-in-silver-lake-seeks-book-donations/ …

What if Everything You Knew About Grains Was Wrong? http://shar.es/B37xj 

Pot grow light interferes with HAM radio bands: http://www.arrl.org/news/view/arrl-to-fcc-grow-light-ballast-causes-hf-interference-violates-rules …

Granjas urbanas ganan terreno en Los Ángeles http://tinyurl.com/ozxeley

How sustainable is digital fabrication? http://www.lowtechmagazine.com/2014/03/how-sustainable-is-digital-fabrication.html …

Winners and losers at the garden show | Garden Rant http://gardenrant.com/2014/03/seen-at-the-garden-show.html …

How to Grow Sweet Potatoes and Mangoes in an Urban Jungle http://tinyurl.com/kltlghw

Vietnamese swimmers ferry passengers across flooded rivers in plastic bags: http://boingboing.net/2014/03/26/vietnamese-swimmers-ferry-pass.html …

Murder Machines: Why Cars Will Kill 30,000 Americans This Year http://www.collectorsweekly.com/articles/murder-machines/ …

Progress on My Figueroa: Institutions Drop Opposition to Protected Bikeways on Figueroa http://wp.me/pbjlx-1vO 

Using earthworms to process hazardous materials containing heavy metals http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/12/101206101241.htm … via @TLAJoanne

Interactive: Snake Oil Supplements? The scientific evidence for health supplements | Information Is Beautiful http://www.informationisbeautiful.net/play/snake-oil-supplements/ …

File under “Duh”:Science Compared Every Diet, and the Winner Is Real Food – James Hamblin – The Atlantic http://bit.ly/1ivLOri via@michaelpollan

Growing Nyjer Thistle In North America: http://www.birdchick.com/wp/2009/12/growing-nyjer-thistle-in-north-america/ …

Interview with Joseph Tainter on Collapse http://varnelis.net/node/1106

Judging the Merits of a Media-Hyped ‘Collapse’ Study – Collide-a-Scape | http://DiscoverMagazine.com  http://bit.ly/1lh0v5f 

“The chief source of problems is solutions.” – Eric Sevareid

For these links and more, follow Root Simple on Twitter:

Why Your Garden Should Be Dark at Night

A confession: I was a teenage astronomy geek. This hobby that gave me an awareness of how depressing it is to live in a city so brightly lit that you can count the number of stars in the night sky.

A documentary, currently streaming on Netflix, called The City Dark details just how many other problems lights cause that you might not have thought of:

  • Lighting confuses migratory birds. Millions crash into buildings every year.
  • Sea turtle hatchlings walk towards city lights rather than the ocean.
  • For us humans? An increased likelihood of breast cancer among women who work at night.
  • Depression and sleep problems.

Worst may be the lack of perspective we humans get when we can’t contemplate the vastness of space. One of the astronomers in the documentary noted that when we lose touch with the scale of the universe we don’t appreciate the fact that we will never leave this earth. The distances are just too great. His point is that if we understood the impossibility of space travel, and gave up fantasizing about space colonies, we’d take better care of our home.

Photo: highline.org.

Highline Park at night. Photo: highline.org.

Keeping Gardens Dark
Thankfully light pollution is an easy fix and saves money and energy too. We can keep our outdoor spaces dark at night to benefit our well being and as well as the survival of nocturnal creatures. Night Sky concluded with a brief interview with Hervé Descottes, one of the lighting designers of the Highline Park in New York City. Descottes’s lighting design shows how you can balance the need for security with respect of the night sky by simply directing lighting downwards.

The International Dark-Sky Association has a guide to residential lighting that will help you keep our skies dark and nocturnal creatures safe. Some recommendations:

  • Choose dark sky friendly lighting fixtures that direct light down, not up.
  • Light only what needs to be lit, i.e. create a lighting plan rather than putting up a huge floodlight.
  • Switch lights off when not in use.
  • Reduce wattage–you don’t need as much as you think.

Here’s another idea: garden with moonlight. Rather than light up your garden with artificial light, include plants with silvery-grey leaves or white flowers. Our white sage glows spectacularly during a full moon. I’m also happy we put in a climbing white rose over our entrance arbor.

By embracing the darkness we can open our eyes to the stars above.