Picture Sundays: Doberman Chariots

Doberman harness racing

“Ready for the race! Brutus of Quintre and his charge are ready for the sulky races, a regular feature of some of the South African sporting events.” Photos via The Doberman Insider.

Now that we are without a car, it’s time for us to figure out alternative forms of transportation. Our late dog was a Doberman and I remembered a book we used to have about the breed that showed some unusual events that used to be held in South Africa in the 1970s: harness racing with Dobermans and kid jockeys!

Remembering just how powerful and fast our Doberman was, I imagine these races were quite a thrill for the kids in those carts.

doberman race

Try this in the US and, no doubt, child protective services would shut down the fun in no time. For the adult version I imagine we’d need a team of Dobes to pull our cart. Practical transportation and the start of Los Angeles’ answer to the Iditerod!

Picture Sundays: An Altoid Box EDC

Altoid Box EDC

Reader Ben Wison sent sent an email about his EDC (everyday carry), along some photos,

Wanted to let you see my EDCs. enjoyed your posts, and figured I would share my improvised Altoids tin. The dividers are made from empty tins cut and riveted in place. My next addition is a iron thin envelope under the mints containing a mini survival kit.

Ben promises an update once the mini-survival kit is assembled.

Want to see more EDC “pocket dump” photos? Check out everyday-carry.com.

Got a favorite Altoid box project? Leave a link . . .

Picture Sundays: Harvard’s Glass Flower Collection

glasscactus

Photo ©President & Fellows Harvard College, photo of Blaschka Glass Model by Hillel Burger.

This cactus is made out of glass. Root Simple reader tworose tipped me off to the Harvard Museum of Natural History’s collection of glass flowers. According to the museum’s website:

This unique collection of over 3,000 models was created by glass artisans Leopold Blaschka and his son, Rudolph. The commission began in 1886, continued for five decades, and the collection represents more than 830 plant species.

Reminds me of the 3D flower x-rays on display at the Museum of Jurassic Technology. They have to be seen in person to really do them justice, but you can see a selection in 2D here.