Roots Simple’s Last Minute Gift Guide

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A KCET blogger asked a couple of Master Food Preservers, including myself, what we thought would be good gifts for homesteady types. We all came up with, pretty much, the same items. Here’s the ones I suggested:

Saving the Season by Kevin West. We reviewed this book a few months ago but I’ll say it again: this is my favorite book on food preservation.

417AOIGAt9LExcalibur dehydrator with stainless steel trays. Expensive, but this thing works a lot better than those cheap round dehydrators. Truly the Cadillac of deyhdrators.

il_570xN.503980826_66051.5 liter lactofermentation kit. Yes, you can make one yourself, but this is a nice all-glass model. Plus, when you buy this you are supporting Ernest Miller who has given countless volunteer hours to build LA’s Master Food Preserver program.

What did you give to the homesteaders in your life? Or did you forgo gifts altogether?

Grist & Toll: An Urban Flour Mill

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Southern California has its first flour mill in a hundred years: Grist & Toll. G &T will be milling grain grown by small farmers here in the Southwest. We’re on the verge of a grain revolution and small mills like Grist & Toll are leading the way.

Dig Grist & Toll’s Austrian grain mill and sifter:

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Rumor has it that Santa is bringing me a mini version of this mill.

Grist & Toll is open for special hours this holiday season:
Friday December 13th 12-6pm
Saturday December 14th 12-5pm
Friday December 20th 12-6pm
Saturday December 21st 12-6pm

Grist & Toll is located at 990 S. Arroyo Parkway #1 in Pasadena, California.

Stop on by and get the bakers in your life some hard to find flours. Make those holiday cookies with tasty Sonora wheat!

If you’re not in the Southern California area leave a comment with some tips on where to find interesting grains where you live . . .

Does Sourdough Offer Hope for the Gluten Intolerant?

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Lactobacillus sanfranciscensis.

In the last 20 years bakers around the world have revived the art of baking with a sourdough culture. At first this revival was related to flavor, but increasingly bakers are turning to sourdough cultures in the interest of health. It’s possible that the unique qualities of sourdough cultures may offer hope to those who think they are gluten intolerant or have an allergy to wheat. 

Continue reading…

Hoshigaki Season

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Astringent persimmons (such as Hachiya) are in season now which means that it’s time to make hoshigaki, a Japanese delicacy made by hanging peeled persimmons up in a window to dry.

Hoshigaki are chewy and subtly sweet. The texture of hoshigaki is different than what you would get if you just put persimmons in a dehydrator. And if all goes right the sugar comes to the surface making it look like the fruit has been dipped in powdered sugar. If you can find them in a Japanese market they are extremely expensive. And the ones I saw at our local market were vastly inferior to my homemade hoshigaki.

I added some details to the instructions I posted last year. Don’t hesitate to leave a comment if you have any questions about making hoshigaki.