Cast Iron Cookware Class at Winnetka Farms

cast iron cookware class poster

Our friends at Winnetka Farms are teaching a cast iron cookware class. I can’t say enough good things about cast iron–we ditched our Teflon years ago. Here’s the 411 on the class:

Cast Iron Cookware
How to use, maintain and restore.

History
We’ll start with a short history of cast iron cookware.

Techniques and use of cast iron
There will be cooking demonstrations (tastings) and discussion of the special techniques and uses of this timeless kitchen tool.

Cleaning and Maintenance
Very importantly the cleaning and maintenance of your cast iron cookware. While there are many theories regarding cleaning and maintaining cast Iron, I’ll discuss and demonstrate the system I adhere to after many years of experience.

Restoring cast iron
Either you found an old rusty pan in a thrift shop or after years of use your skillet needs more then a cleaning, you’ll learn how and what to do to restore that favorite piece in your collection.

If you have a problem piece of cast iron you can’t “fix,” bring it to class so I can make a recommendation to restore your item.

Thirty dollars per student to be paid upon arrival. Check or cash only. This class has a limit of 12 students. Light foods and beverages will be served.

Location and more info here.

Defining a Garden’s Purpose

Organic Mechanic's Garden in San Francisco

Organic Mechanic’s Garden in San Francisco

I’m an idiot when it comes to garden design. To up my skills in this department I attended the annual Garden Blogger’s Fling last week, which took place this year in San Francisco. Thankfully the Fling did not involve sitting in a sterile hotel conference room. Instead, we boarded two buses and took a look at fifteen spectacular gardens in the bay area over three days.

I’ll share the gardening lessons I learned over a couple of posts. But if I could take away only one lesson it would be this: every garden has a purpose, but great gardens have clear and beneficial purposes.

Continue reading…

Saturday Linkages: Of Tiny Shops and Margarita Dermatitis

The smallest shop in London.

The smallest shop in London.

Gardening
How to make a ferrocement raised bed: http://www.ruralize.com/Genes  Projects/ferrocement/ferrocement garden bed.html

The Agony and the Ecstasy of Gardening with Children: http://www.nwedible.com/2013/06/the-agony-and-the-ecstasy-of-gardening-with-children.html …

Live light

Join the Aussies in a Plastic-Free July: http://www.plasticfreejuly.org/the-challenge.html

Stuff to worry about
With 2 Weeks’ Worth Of Trans Fat, Long John Silver’s ‘Big Catch’ Dubbed Worst Restaurant Meal http://wp.me/p2L7Ik-GvOF 

Four paralyzed after herb mix-up in Italy: http://barfblog.com/2013/06/4-paralyzed-after-herb-mix-up-in-italy/ …

Royal Mail warns Shropshire man over ‘aggressive’ raspberry bush | http://metro.co.uk/2013/06/28/postmen-refuse-to-deliver-mail-to-shropshire-man-with-aggressive-raspberry-bush-3860915/ …

Combination Of Limes, Sun Can Result In ‘Margarita Dermatitis’: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/08/070815153545.htm#.UdXAlb3MdZ8.twitter …

Twitter to allow advertisers to target your browsing history, email addresses; here’s how to opt out: http://boingboing.net/2013/07/03/twitter-will-allow-advertisers.html …

???
Smallest shop in history: http://collectivehistory.tumblr.com/post/54217812035/the-smallest-shop-in-london-a-shoe-salesman-with …

For these links and more, follow Root Simple on Twitter:

Farm Hack

farm hack

Farm Hack is an innovative blog that synthesizes high tech and low tech in the service of growing food and community. The blog is run by the National Young Farmers Coalition. While geared towards agriculture, many of the posts will be of interest to backyard gardeners. Recent subjects include a project to develop an infrared camera to monitor plant health, smartphone tools for farmers and open source appropriate technology resources. It’s exactly this kind of innovation that gives me great hope for the future.

Thanks to Tommy Berbas for the tip.