022 Mark Stambler on How to Pass a Cottage Food Bill

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Mark Stambler was baking bread at home and selling it at local shops, until a knock at his door one day from the health department. Rather than get angry he got the law changed and the story of how this happened is the subject of this week’s Root Simple Podcast. During the podcast Mark mentions:

You can find out more about Mark and his bread at stamblersbread.com.

If you want to leave a question for the Root Simple Podcast please call (213) 537-2591 or send an email to [email protected]. You can subscribe to our podcast in the iTunes store and on Stitcher. The theme music is by Dr. Frankenstein. Additional music by Rho. A downloadable version of this podcast is here.

How to Store Fresh Fruits and Vegetables

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Did you know that apples should be stored at room temperature for the first seven days and then go into the refrigerator? That ginger should be stored only at room temp? Preventing food waste is a topic getting a lot of attention thanks to a new documentary, Just Eat It. Estimates are that 40% of all food ends up in the dumpster.

UC Davis has an incredible resource for preventing food waste in our homes in the form of a pdf you can print out and post on your refrigerator. We’ve linked to it before, but it’s worth repeating: Storing Fresh Fruits and Vegetables for Better Taste.

Kimchi Class with Hae Jung Cho November 15

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Kimchi master Hae Jung Cho is teaching a how-to class on November 15 at 10 am:

This 3-hour class is a hands-on experience where you make two kinds of fermented kimchi – napa cabbage (poggi) and radish (kkakdugi) – and one quick pickle. We then share a light meal of rice, kimchi, soup and other side dishes. You leave the class with three containers of kimchi and pickles that you have made, printed recipes and the know-how to replicate the kimchi at home. Fee: $75.

Anyone interested in this class should email Hae Jung at [email protected]. More info here.

Saturday Tweets: Food Waste, Log Floors and Trash Can Potatoes