Update on Hedge Fund Billionaire Crispin Odey’s $250,000 Chicken Coop

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British hedge fund billionaire Crispin Odey has done for chicken coops what Laibach does for popular music. That is to say, take a simple form and do it up in grand dictator style.

Odey’s coop also managed to exceed Marie Antoinette’s fake farm in the questionable timing department. He got a lot of bad press for beginning his $250,000 marble chicken coop in the midst of an economic downturn. An article in the New York Times, A Hedge Fund Highflier Comes Back to Earth, indicates that Odey has had to do some damage control,

Never one to sit still, he is also repositioning his poultry palace, which he said had “morphed into a library.” So what is the deal with the coop anyway?

“For me it’s more of a folly than a chicken house,” he said, referring to the ornamental buildings that adorn some of the grand English estates of past centuries.

He gamely showed photos of the nearly completed structure on his iPhone. “Once I started thinking about what I wanted to have there, it was a Schinkelian temple.” Karl Friedrich Schinkel, he explained, was the architect who worked for the Prussian royal family, “and built almost all of that stuff you come across in Brandenburg and in Berlin.”

Mr. Odey pointed to a relief visible along one wall. “I have the chickens and egg having the age-old fight of who came first,” he smiled. “It’s carved in stone,” and there will be a Latin inscription, “Quis primus venit?”

Meaning?

“Meaning, ‘Who came first?’ ”

So is it a chicken coop and a library? Perhaps Odey is familiar with the poultry housing described in Cato the Elder’s De Agricultura. In this early Roman agriculture manual Cato details a live-in chicken coop that provides housing for a worker who collects the eggs and keeps predators away. Maybe he can read Cato while admiring his hens. Just look out for those peasants with pitchforks . . .

001 Transplants vs. Seedlings, Josey Baker Bread, Gluten Intolerance and Rats in the Compost

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As they say in Silicon Valley, if you’re first release is perfect you’re too late. With that in mind, I’m finally putting up the first (after a few false starts) Root Simple audio podcast.

Right now the format is Kelly and I recapping recent blog posts and going into greater detail. Plus we answer some long overdue reader questions. When we get more comfortable with podcasting we’ll start having guests.

In this episode of the Root Simple podcast we discuss transplants vs. direct sowing, the book Josey Baker Bread, gluten intolerance and answer a listener question about rats.

Let us know what you think and what you’d like us to cover. If you want to leave a question you can call (213) 537-2591 or send an email to [email protected].

The theme music is by Dr. Frankenstein. Additional music by Rho.

A downloadable version of this podcast is here. You can subscribe to our podcast in the iTunes store.

Bees Like Mochi

This viral video proves two things:

1. Bees like sugar.

2. Foraging bees aren’t likely to sting.

And I love the way this street vendor keeps on working. If this were the US, there’d be a major freak out, the fire and health departments would be called and an exterminator would show up to spray poison. If you keep calm and carry on you get your mochi and the bees get a free lunch.

Thanks to Winnetka Farms for the tip. 

Pakistan Mulberry Fever

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Let me just say Pakistan mulberries. Now let me say it again. Pakistan Mulberries.  Let’s all repeat that as a mantra.

What are they? The tastiest fruit in the know universe. Imagine a longish, very sweet but ever so slightly exotic tasting berry. The problem: they go bad so fast that you practically have to eat them off the tree. The other problem: we have no more room left to grow a Pakistan mulberry tree. Thankfully fruit tree guru Steve Hofvendahl sold me two small strawberry cartons full of them over the weekend.

Now I need a regular Pakistani mulberry fix. If I wanted to plant one Bay Laurel Nursery has several varieties. It’s mostly a warm climate plant but some varieties do better in lower temperatures.

Here’s what Steve had to say about his six year old tree which he thinks is the “Cooke” variety:

It has totally thrived and become huge.  I have to top back huge vertical branches every year after harvest season and tie limbs down laterally.
And the harvest goes on and on and is not easy, you cannot shake the tree without bringing down loads of green fruit and stubborn ripe berries won’t fall.  You have to hand pick and it takes about 2-3 hours of combing over the tree from all the different angles with the orchard ladder.
Then I soak ’em in a vinegar water solution and rinse and lay in flats refrigerated and finally weigh the good ones up, the not so good ones get made into delicious juice for jellies and my Jamalade with cumquats and/or habanero.
So it would probably maybe still be worth it to you but know what you are maybe getting into!

Again, the taste is so amazing that if I had the room I’d say it’s worth the hassle of harvesting.

Note from Mrs. Homegrown:  I wanted to add that the odd things about these mulberries is that they have a green stem which runs all the way through the center of the fruit, so when you eat them your sort  of scrape the fruit (drupes?) off the stem with your teeth, then discard it. Not that this is a problem–they’re delicious! I guess the stem is necessary to support their length.

Saturday Linkages: Holiday Weekend Edition

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Sailboat made with Home Depot buckets: http://www.pdracer.com/boat-shorty/50-dollar-sailboat-race/tbucket/ …

Brick wall collapses to reveal giant beehive via @BoingBoing http://boingboing.net/2014/05/22/brick-wall-collapses-to-reveal.html …

8 Takeaways From the Bike League’s Study of Cyclist Fatalities http://usa.streetsblog.org/2014/05/22/8-takeaways-from-the-bike-leagues-study-of-cyclist-fatalities/#.U39XY2qRa40.twitter … via @StreetsblogUSA

Brandalism 2014: 40 street artists. 10 cities. 365 ad takeovers. 2 days.: http://youtu.be/lKRmVwqhEdE 

What happened to the man who made canned rattlesnake? via @BoingBoing http://boingboing.net/2014/05/22/what-happened-to-the-man-who-m.html …

Animal First, Citizen Second: Talking Bodily Politic with Nance Klehm #occupy http://shar.es/VuHNP

Silver Lake sheep shot http://www.theeastsiderla.com/2014/05/silver-lake-sheep-shot/ … via @TheEastsiderLA

Haitian Machete Fencing Is a Real Sport, and This Old Guy Is its Yoda http://gawker.com/haitian-machete-fencing-is-a-real-sport-and-this-old-g-1579082727/+aweinstein …

Confessions of an Outlaw http://boingboing.net/2014/05/21/confessions-of-an-outlaw.html …

An Egg on the Floor | HenCam http://hencam.com/henblog/2014/05/an-egg-on-the-floor/ … via @terrygolson

What Farm-to-Table Got Wrong http://nyti.ms/1nUIJGp 

Always hungry? Here’s why http://nyti.ms/1lIBNIX  via @nytopinion

Granny & Shady Lady: When “craft” crosses the line http://boingboing.net/2014/05/16/granny-shady-lady-when-c.html …

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