Dramm’s Breaker Nozzle: My Favorite Watering Implement

Dramm Breaker Nozzle

I can’t count how many cheap watering implements we’ve gone through since we bought this house fifteen years ago. Big box store watering widgets seem to last just a few weeks before heading to the landfill.

I think I’ve found a solution. During the Garden Blogger’s Fling I attended back in June there was a demo by a Dramm Company representative. What impressed me most at the demo was Dramm’s simplest products, the Heavy-Duty Aluminum Water Breaker Nozzle combined with their¬†Aluminum Shut-Off Valve.

400nozzle copy2

The breaker nozzle provides a gentle shower, much like a Haws Watering Can and would be appropriate to use on seedlings and vegetables. The shut-off valve is extremely durable. Neither item has plastic parts. They are sold separately.

While a lot more expensive than those plastic watering wands at the big box store, I have a feeling that these two high quality Dramm components will last a lot longer.

Share this post

Leave a comment

10 Comments

  1. I agree, with all the gadgets out there, this is my go to nozzle as well, I like the brass shut-off, but otherwise I’m in total agreement, just don’t drop it on something and dent sprayer part, it just never sprays the same even pattern after that…………….

  2. I have a few Dramm implements, but never thought to put these two together! The ones I have last and last and I buy them because they’re made of metal instead of the cheepo plastic ones. The only reason I ever buy more Dramm’s is because I tend to ‘lose’ them, so I’ve started by giving them a blast of red spray paint so I can find them easily among the flowers.

  3. I bought a cute yellow plastic nozzle with a dial for different spray patterns and was so happy. It broke when someone just dropped it instead of laying it down after spraying. Then, I bought another and it lasted six weeks because the plastic in sun degraded and the handle broke. I complained bitterly to the guy at Lowe’s. He took me to the sturdy ones that cost twice as much and assured me that it would not break–all brass or something. H traded my the broken cheap plastic nozzle for the more expensive nozzle. I am cured of wanting a plastic, dial nozzle. Cheap is just cheap! But, a Dramm nozzle will not be found in this town.

  4. have THREE Dramm watering wands – which is what I’m able to buy locally. One was decent and still works although the PLASTIC shut off valve broke and was replaced with an ACE metal one. One has been tossed cause it just started leaking all over after less than a year. It has been replaced with an ACE brand metal unit. The third Dram wand is trying to come apart but I won’t let it. Unfortunately, ACE is what I’ve got and these are what they carry.

  5. I used to work in a commercial greenhouse, where we used Dramm watering tools. I especially liked the brass shutoff; you can even use it without a nozzle, to ‘pressure wash’ things with the valve opened just a little to create a small stream with good pressure. And having a shutoff saves you walking back to the main tap when you need to change nozzles or stop watering.

    Another great Dramm tool is the brass Fogg-It nozzle, (yes, really). We used this to moisten newly-planted seed trays in a very fine mist without washing away tiny (and costly) seeds, or to mist benches of cuttings that are being rooted. This is what it looks like: http://www.pro-horticulture.com/Dramm-610FC-Fogg-It-Watering-Nozzle_p_518.html

    After using these tools at work, I ordered some for home, and cannot imagine gardening now without them. I was spending more on crappy plastic ones that always cracked, so the brass is actually cheaper in the end.

  6. Having gone though 3 ‘cheap’ nozzles in the past few months, and the current one stopped shutting all the way off this afternoon, this post is of high relevance! Thanks for the tip!

  7. Thanks for the review. Its nice to have considering how many of us probably broke 2 or 3 sprayer nozzles this summer alone. This is what I need. I’ll be ordering it when I order seeds this winter.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.


7 + 4 =