Tomato Report: Indigo Rose

Another tomato I got to taste on my trip up California’s central coast was the striking, nearly black “Indigo Rose”. The Indigo Rose tomato was bred conventionally by Oregon State University specifically to have high levels of antioxidants. Those antioxidants are in the tomato thanks to a class of flavonoids called anthocyanin, substances which also give the fruit its dark color.

According to Oregon State,

Indigo Rose’s genesis began in the 1960s, when two breeders – one from Bulgaria and the other from the United States – first crossed-cultivated tomatoes with wild species from Chile and the Galapagos Islands . . . Some wild tomato species have anthocyanins in their fruit, and until now, tomatoes grown in home gardens have had the beneficial pigment only in their leaves and stems, which are inedible.

The size is somewhat bigger than a cherry tomato. The inside of the tomato is a dark red. The taste? Good, even though the one I tried had not matured yet. I’m going to consider growing these next year.

You can find out more about the Indigo Rose on the Oregon State Extension Service website.

Indigo Rose seeds can be purchased through Johnny’s Select Seeds.

Tomato Report: Blush

I think I’ve tasted my new favorite tomato variety: Blush. I got to tuck into a box of these delicious tomatoes at the farm of Shu and Debbie Takikawa near Los Olivos. Yellow with red streaks, Blush tomatoes have the perfect balance of sweetness and acidity.

The blush tomato was developed by geneticist and tomato geek Fred Hempel and are available via Seeds of Change.

Due to a series of gardening blunders that I’ll blog about at some point, we’re not going to have many tomatoes this summer from our yard. Thankfully I can visit Shu and Debbie’s stand at the Altadena Farmer’s Market on Wednesdays.

If you’ve grown Blush tomatoes please leave a comment and let us know how they did.

Saturday Linkages: Pig’s Milk, Hot Sauce, Clutter

Nettle hot sauce recipe from the Wild Food Lab.

How About a Nice Cold Glass of Camel, Buffalo, or Pig Milk?

Artisinal cocktail movement gets out of hand: Stop the Madness! | Garden Rant  

Yes, there’s a parasite of the day blog:

The Clutter Culture via UCLA Magazine 

And, how to deal with that clutter: Unf#$&^% Your Habitat: a smart phone ap for messy people: 

Compendium of Research Reports on Use of Non-Traditional Materials for Crop Production:  

Cross-contamination: washing chicken or any meat is a bad idea | barfblog: 

Making hot sauces with wild plants:  

How to Restore an Heirloom Axe | The Art of Manliness  

Of all the linkages this week this is the most important: please consider helping one of Los Angeles’ bike activists, Shay Sanchez, defeat a terrible disease: Raise Money for Shay’s Kick Butt and Get Better Fund –  

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