The Spice Zee Nectaplum

We just harvested our first Spice Zee Nectaplum and, no exaggeration here, it was just about the tastiest fruit we’ve ever eaten–very sweet, with a indescribably rich taste and aroma. The nectaplum is a complex hybrid developed by Zaiger’s Genetics and sold through the Dave Wilson Nursery. It’s a gorgeous tree, with deep red leaves in the spring that gradually become a dark green by mid-summer.

Hybrid fruit trees are created by applying pollen to seed bearing stock to make a cross. The Zaigers have an innovative movable container system that allows them to cross lots of fruit trees each spring. The nectaplum was the result of years of work and many crosses. It’s not a simple process. From the Dave Wilson website:

At Zaiger’s Genetics, of the 50,000 trees planted per year, only 300 to 400 remain after three years, and even fewer after 10 years. The final trees get six years to see if they are commercial grade. “It isn’t a get-rich-quick deal,” Zaiger says, smiling. “You have to have an understanding wife that will let you go off on a 20-year project with no income.”

Dave Wilson is a wholesale nursery, so if you’d like to buy a nectaplum you’ll have to ask your local nursery to order one for you or get one online from Peaceful Valley Farm and Garden Supply.  If you’ve got the space I’d highly recommend this tree. If I could have only one fruit tree it would be this one.

USDA zones 7-9
Chill requirement: 200 to 300 hours

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9 Comments

  1. I thought that required a lot higher chill hours? It looks like it does not and we will definitely be trying that one down here in north SD county. Another good one by Zaiger and one that is low chill is the Flavor Supreme pluot.

  2. Looks like a great fruit. I’ve really been enjoying the peaches and nectarines from our local farmer’s market, and since reading The Urban Homestead, I’ve wanted to plant a tree or two.

    I’m in Southern California and probably have a very similar climate to you, but I wanted to understand “Chill Hours” better. Do you have a resource that you’d recommend? Searching Google results in a lot of varying information, and it seems like we don’t spend 200-300 hours below 45 degrees in coastal California.

  3. Thanks for the link!

    I’m in Orange County, so if I use the Irvine station, we’re only at 95 hours for the season, and it looks like there have been multiple seasons less than 200 hours over the last 6 years. It’s amazing to see the variation in chill hours over coastal SoCal – so many microclimates.

  4. Hopefully Dave Wilson Nursery and Zaiger Genetics has nothing to do with gene spicing in any way that’s not natural hybriding

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